Author Topic: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?  (Read 5568 times)

Offline aikidoka

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What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« on: October 21, 2015, 05:23:00 PM »
So, does the title refer to the Predator?  Even though Grimm was incensed when people tried to imply (or outright state in Rook's case) that it was only fit for the work of a windlass?
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Offline Dina

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Re: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2015, 06:29:53 PM »
I think so. Remember he told the spirearch than the Predator was not a windlass and the spirearch convinced him to do it once in exchange of the cristals. So this time, the Predator acted as a windlass.
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Offline Shodan

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Re: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2015, 05:09:32 PM »
A windlass can only go up and down...(Its just like a winch).  it was an insult to call predator that, but at the time since her crystals were broken, she could only do that so it was kinda true.  The name of the book makes sense, its kinda like using the word thief in the title to refer to a hero that starts out ragged and roguish.

Offline Quantus

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Re: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2015, 09:54:48 PM »
Any idea's where "Cinder Spires" comes from?  Spires makes sense, but the only mention of "cinder" is that they call it Cinderstone in the first few chapters, but Spirestone after Ch 6. 
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Offline Second Aristh

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Re: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2015, 12:27:05 AM »
Any idea's where "Cinder Spires" comes from?  Spires makes sense, but the only mention of "cinder" is that they call it Cinderstone in the first few chapters, but Spirestone after Ch 6.
Perhaps cinder is a reference to some kind of a post-apocalyptic scenario, the cinders remaining after some big cataclysmic fire.
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Offline Griffyn612

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Re: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2015, 12:55:55 AM »
I agree that the name "Aeronaut's Windlass" doesn't seem to fit.

As for the name Cinder Spires, my guess is that they were grown for the survivors of whatever conditions were spreading across the surface.  Those that first saw them, with presumably a dark earthy appearance and the empty pockets that humanity would move in to, compared it to cinder lava rock.

Offline Dina

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Re: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2015, 02:20:22 AM »
Why not? I think we stablished why it is called TAW and it makes sense.

Also, I agree with Second Aristh but I think the spires will be in Cinder in future, perhaps as a consequence as a global war.
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Offline Griffyn612

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Re: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2015, 04:13:09 AM »
Why not? I think we stablished why it is called TAW and it makes sense.
Sorry, doesn't make sense to me.  The book's named Windlass after a ship that isn't a Windlass?  Nope.  That'd be like naming a Dresden book "BROKEN WHEELS" because Harry is fighting an epic battle against a legendary demon from mythology, and the Blue Beetle has a flat tire, making it more difficult to get around town.

The name has no bearing on the plot.  It's a minor subplot at best for one of half a dozen narrating characters.  Enjoyed the book, and like the name.  But it doesn't make sense.

Offline Dina

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Re: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2015, 04:18:50 AM »
Well, sorry. We will have to agree in disagree because it makes perfect sense to me. It's like someone is understimating you, using a mocking name and you still excel. Something like if the title would have been "the underdog". Oh, something of "small favor" too  :D
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Offline Quantus

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Re: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2015, 01:55:57 PM »
Sorry, doesn't make sense to me.  The book's named Windlass after a ship that isn't a Windlass?  Nope.  That'd be like naming a Dresden book "BROKEN WHEELS" because Harry is fighting an epic battle against a legendary demon from mythology, and the Blue Beetle has a flat tire, making it more difficult to get around town.

The name has no bearing on the plot.  It's a minor subplot at best for one of half a dozen narrating characters.  Enjoyed the book, and like the name.  But it doesn't make sense.
In this instance I think it would be more like if harry had to run around the first five sixths of the book with no Magic; the Predator is the core of Grimm's character (and by some theories a part of his very soul), and a major motivation for the events of the book was to get it repaired so that it would become (or stay) a Windlace.  I also see a touch of irony, it's the euqivalent to The Privateer's Barge, which is both humorous and what I'll name my beach-side bar someday. 
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Offline Brightbane

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Re: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« Reply #10 on: October 23, 2015, 03:37:29 PM »
I agree that the name "Aeronaut's Windlass" doesn't seem to fit.

As for the name Cinder Spires, my guess is that they were grown for the survivors of whatever conditions were spreading across the surface.  Those that first saw them, with presumably a dark earthy appearance and the empty pockets that humanity would move in to, compared it to cinder lava rock.
The spires are black (mostly), so I would assume that is why they're called cinder. It's being used as an adjective for the color of them

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The black stone from which the spires had been constructed was all but indestructible, and had withstood the ravages of time for millennia- but the Builders had taken the secret of its working with them when they vanished from the world.
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Offline Griffyn612

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Re: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« Reply #11 on: October 23, 2015, 04:00:06 PM »
In this instance I think it would be more like if harry had to run around the first five sixths of the book with no Magic; the Predator is the core of Grimm's character (and by some theories a part of his very soul), and a major motivation for the events of the book was to get it repaired so that it would become (or stay) a Windlace.  I also see a touch of irony, it's the euqivalent to The Privateer's Barge, which is both humorous and what I'll name my beach-side bar someday.
I get the reference, but I just don't think it makes sense as a book title.  It's a minor quibble.  The book was enjoyable, and I had no issues with any of it.  I just don't feel like the title fits. 

Offline Quantus

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Re: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« Reply #12 on: October 23, 2015, 04:11:20 PM »
I get the reference, but I just don't think it makes sense as a book title.  It's a minor quibble.  The book was enjoyable, and I had no issues with any of it.  I just don't feel like the title fits.
Fair enough.  Perhaps it will fit better once there are more titles in the series for context/comparison
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Offline Second Aristh

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Re: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« Reply #13 on: October 23, 2015, 05:00:15 PM »
Knowing Jim, there will be some kind of pattern to the titles.  Dresden has the two word/equal letters scheme, and Alera had the various stages as Tavi grew up.  My first guess is Cinder Spires will have (character reference)x(plot object for the particular book) and revolve along the major characters. 

Aeronaut's Windlass - Grimm & Predator
Olympian Affair (assuming this title doesn't get updated) - perhaps the Olympian captain from Habble Landing and going to recover the core crystal of the downed airship from AW?  As an alternative, is Captain Ransom Olympian?
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Offline Quantus

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Re: What does the "Aeronaut's Windlass" refer to?
« Reply #14 on: October 23, 2015, 05:12:10 PM »
Olympian Affair (assuming this title doesn't get updated) - perhaps the Olympian captain from Habble Landing and going to recover the core crystal of the downed airship from AW?  As an alternative, is Captain Ransom Olympian?
There are also the Olympian Trials, which could become politically significant if they go on despite the war if they are the Olypics equivalent I think they are. 
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